“a sane reaction to insane circumstances”

11 08 2013

To all appearances, Eleanor Longden was just like every other student, heading to college full of promise and without a care in the world. That was until the voices in her head started talking. Initially innocuous, these internal narrators became increasingly antagonistic and dictatorial, turning her life into a living nightmare. Diagnosed with schizophrenia, hospitalized, drugged, Longden was discarded by a system that didn’t know how to help her. Longden tells the moving tale of her years-long journey back to mental health, and makes the case that it was through learning to listen to her voices that she was able to survive.

Eleanor Longden overcame her diagnosis of schizophrenia to earn a master’s in psychology and demonstrate that the voices in her head were “a sane reaction to insane circumstances.

 

To see & hear her talk at TED click HERE

 

EL





The Psychiatric rehabilitation law in Israel

28 02 2012

In the past decades there have been substantial changes in the Israeli mental health field in general, and in the community based psychiatric rehabilitation in particular. These changes occurred both in policy making level and in practice level. Since 2001 the Israeli Ministry of Health has been in the process of developing community based psychiatric rehabilitation services as part of the implementation of the Rehabilitation in the Community of People with a Psychiatric Disability Law or “Psychiatric Rehabilitation Law”.

This law combines the rights of people with disability and the rights to dignity and liberty– in the psychiatric rehabilitation field prospective. The main goal of this law is “to work diligently for the rehabilitation and social inclusion of people with a psychiatric disability in order to allow them to achieve the maxim amount of independence and quality of life, while keeping their dignity according to the Basic Law: Human Dignity and Liberty” (2000).  Furthermore, this law emphasizes the importance of social inclusion of people with psychiatric disabilities as part of the rehabilitation process; and stated that all Israelis with a psychiatric disability will enjoy the right for community based psychiatric rehabilitation services provided by the country.

Nonetheless, while there are many developments in research and practice in this field in Israel, there are still many barriers that slow down the positive progresses in this field: the medical model approach is still dominant in policy and in budgets; the shift from the “protected” rehabilitation approach that encourages low functioning and social exclusion to “empowered” approach that encourages high functioning and social inclusion is slow; the passage from paternalistic attitude from many sectors in the system to a more self-definition attitude for the consumers and therapeutic practices and social attitude that maintain mental illness stigma and discrimination are still common; and still many people do not have access to psychiatric rehabilitation services.

For more information read these recent papers by Aviram, Ginat and Roe and by Drake, Hogan, Slade and Thornicroft.

For questions, clarifications and any other inquiries about this issue please feel free to contact me.

Have a great day!